How do you get Indian corn?

What’s the difference between Indian corn and regular corn?

Indian or flint corn with colorful kernels. Most corn comes in just yellow or white, but Indian corn is much more variable. Some varieties are a single color in shades of white, red, blue and black, but most are multi-colored.

Is Indian corn poisonous?

Is Indian corn poisonous? So can you eat Indian Corn? They are indeed edible. And in fact, a lot closer to the natural corn that used to grow in the great plains than the sweet corn we see today.

Why do farmers leave corn in the field?

Field corn, also sometimes called “cow corn,” stays in the fields until the ears dry because corn is very high in moisture and must be dry to be processed. That is why farmers leave stalks in the field until they are golden brown in the fall. … Some of that corn is saved to provide seed for the next season’s corn crop.

Can you plant Indian corn next to sweet corn?

Coolong says it’s important not to plant Indian corn near sweet corn because they will cross-pollinate, and your sweet corn will not be very sweet. Keep the plots a minimum of 250-feet apart. … The ears will set in early summer and should be left on the plant until later in the season.

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Will popcorn cross pollinate with Indian corn?

Similar to sweet corn, ornamental and popcorn production requires particular attention to watering. … Remember that these corn varieties will cross-pollinate with other types of corn, so you must isolate them from both sweet and field corn.

Why can’t you eat blue corn off the cob?

While blue corn cannot be eaten off the cob, it’s packed with health benefits and a strong nutty flavor, making it an ingredient with value beyond its usual role as a mainstay in tortilla chips. … Its rich, sweet taste makes blue cornmeal a delicious replacement for traditional corn in muffins, bread and griddle cakes.

Does Indian corn make colorful popcorn?

Indian corn can be ground to make flour, or the whole kernel can be reserved for popcorn. … These calico-patterned or speckled varieties of Indian corn result from cross-pollination of single-shaded plants. In addition to the multicolored ears, there are solid ears in shades of white, ruby, blue and black.