Which language was recognized as the national language by the Constitution of India?

How many languages are Recognised by the Constitution besides Hindi?

Besides Hindi, there are 21 other languages, which are recognised as Scheduled Languages by the constitution.

What is language policy class 12?

Language policy is a safeguard to the languages. It is one of the important aspects of our Constitution. Under this policy besides Hindi, 21 other languages are recognized as Scheduled Languages by the Constitution.

What is national and official language?

A national language is a language with a political, cultural, and social unit connected with it. An official language is a language used by the government of a country. However, both of these terms are used for politic means in many countries.

Which country has 37 language?

According to the 2005 Census of Colombia, the country has 37 major languages. More than 99.5% of Colombians speak Spanish. English has official status in the San Andrés, Providencia and Santa Catalina Islands. In addition to Spanish, there are several other languages spoken in Colombia.

Which are the 22 languages Recognised by the Constitution of India?

The Eighth Schedule to the Constitution consists of the following 22 languages: (1) Assamese, (2) Bengali, (3) Gujarati, (4) Hindi, (5) Kannada, (6) Kashmiri, (7) Konkani, (8) Malayalam, (9) Manipuri, (10) Marathi, (11) Nepali, (12) Oriya, (13) Punjabi, (14) Sanskrit, (15) Sindhi, (16) Tamil, (17) Telugu, (18) Urdu (19 …

IT IS INTERESTING:  When was Indian national flag adopted?

Which are the 22 languages Recognised by the Constitution of India write with the name of state?

The 22 languages in the Eighth Schedule are Assamese, Bengali, Bodo, Dogri, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Maithili, Malayalam, Manipuri, Marathi, Nepali, Odia, Punjabi, Sanskrit, Santhali, Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu and Urdu.

What is meant by national language?

A national language is a language (or language variant, e.g. dialect) that has some connection—de facto or de jure—with a nation. There is little consistency in the use of this term. … “Central language” (politolect) used by government and perhaps having a symbolic value.