Why do British eat Indian food?

How did Indian food become popular in Britain?

Indian restaurants first appeared in England in the 19th century, catering for Asian seamen and students, and then multiplied in the 1950s and 60s to feed the newly arrived south Asian factory workers. But their boom time only began in the 70s, when they adapted their menus for a working-class, white clientele.

What Indian dishes are actually British?

Dishes. Well-known Anglo-Indian dishes include chutneys, salted beef tongue, kedgeree, ball curry, fish rissoles, and mulligatawny soup. Chutney, one of the few Indian dishes that has had a lasting influence on English cuisine, is a cooked and sweetened but not highly spiced preparation of fruit, nuts or vegetables.

Why do I like Indian food so much?

The labor-intensive cuisine and its mix of spices is more often than not a revelation for those who sit down to eat it for the first time. Heavy doses of cardamom, cayenne, tamarind and other flavors can overwhelm an unfamiliar palate. Together, they help form the pillars of what tastes so good to so many people.

Why do the British eat so much curry?

The British Love of Curries

Just how and why this came to be is allied to the presence of the British Raj in India. The British army and civilians working in India developed a liking for the hot, spicy foods of the sub-continent and brought the dishes (curries) home and to other parts of the then British Empire.

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Is Indian food popular in USA?

Although Indian food makes up less than two percent of the ethnic food market in the United States, it has had the fastest growing rate. Although Indian food makes up less than two percent of the ethnic food market in the United States, it has had the fastest growing rate.

Who brought curry to England?

Almost 200 years before the Indian restaurant became a fixture on the British high street, Mahomed, a Muslim soldier, founded the first curry establishment in Britain, the Hindoostane Coffee House in Portman Square, London. It gave the gentry of Georgian England their first taste of spicy dishes.